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M LeMont Recommends: The Top 5 reasons I'm Self-Publishing

MLeMont Follow @mistersalesman

The following post is the best I've read on staying Indie, instead of going with the big houses.

I only curated a few lines. If you like it, at the end, I provide the link to the full story.

Disclaimer: If any author/writer objects to receiving "free publicity" then hit the Contact Us button--send me a message, and I'll remove your content. It's a dawn of a new day, and if you can't see the benefits of having your content on multiple platforms, then all I can say is "Hasta la vista baby."

The Top 5 Reasons I'm Self-Publishing – Instead of Going Back to the Big Guys

By Sheri McInnis @SLMcInnis via @gordona_wilson

Gordon asked me to explain why I've decided to self-publish my third novel after working with traditional publishers on my other books. He said most writers consider a book deal the "holy grail." Why would I make the change?

I know what he means. All my life I dreamed about getting published too. I was lucky enough to have it happen twice: first by Simon & Schuster/Atria and then again by MacMillan/St. Martin's Press.

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I know a lot of writers are on the fence about going indy, so if you're confused, I hope my top five reasons can help.

1) CONTROL

I've worked with some of the most successful editors in the business – and I was especially fond of my first one at Atria. But that didn't make the revision process any easier.

Because as much as publishers hail creative freedom, unless you deliver an 'approved manuscript' your book won't even be published. That means there's subtle pressure on you to take your editor's notes – whether you agree with them or not.

The editor isn't the only one who requests changes either. Notes will come from your agent, the editorial assistant, even the publisher. And their input can range anywhere from the helpful – to the heartbreaking.

Even the marketing department gets in on things. For instance, the marketing people didn't like the original title of my first book, so the publisher changed it to Devil May Care. Bad luck for me because at around the same time another 'devil' book came out. But you probably heard of that one.

The Devil Wears Prada was so popular, people didn't just confuse the titles – they actually thought I was Lauren Weisberger! One bookstore manager was so excited to meet because my book was "just flying off the shelves!"

You can't imagine how disappointed we both were when I got to the store and he had a huge stack of Prada waiting for me to sign.

Remember there are lots of people who get involved in publishing your book – and as the author, you aren't the one with the most control.

2) TIMING

Even if I signed a contract tomorrow, the book wouldn't hit the shelves for at least eighteen months – probably more. I simply don't want to wait that long.

For one thing, I'm not getting any younger. But most importantly, the main part of the book takes place in 2021. There are technological advances and environmental disasters that only make sense with a believable padding of time.

Read the full story: by Sheri McInnis via ‏@gordona_wilson

http://www.firetok.com/2015/08/the-holy-grail-for-authors-5-reasons-to.html

People who read this post maybe interested in book 2 of my Dare 2B GR8 series Write Like You're Already Famous

Click Here:

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